Points - Recent Research
Efficacy of Acupuncture and Moxibustion in Alopecia
Acupuncture for Cancer-Related Insomnia
Mechanism of Action of Zhi Gan Cao Decoction for Atrial Fibrillation & Myocardial Fibrosis in a Mouse Model of Atrial Fibrillation

Efficacy of Acupuncture and Moxibustion in Alopecia

Andraia R Li, et al.

Abstract
Acupuncture is the practice of applying needles to target specific pressures points in the body. Since originating in China, acupuncture has been practiced for thousands of years to treat numerous conditions including chronic pain and mood disorders. Alopecia is a common dermatologic condition associated with psychological distress and decreased quality of life. Although it remains underexplored in western medicine, recent evidence suggests that acupuncture may be efficacious in the treatment of alopecia. In this review, we discuss the available evidence describing the efficacy of acupuncture or moxibustion alone (ACU) and in combination with other traditional and alternative interventions (ACU + TRAD) for hair loss. Additionally, the proposed physiologic mechanisms, targeted acupuncture points, and the benefits and barriers to treatment will be further described. An exploratory search using PubMed, EMBASE and Scopus databases was performed for studies that evaluated the effect of acupuncture and moxibustion on alopecia. In these studies, both ACU and ACU + TRAD were efficacious for numerous etiologies of hair loss including alopecia areata, androgenetic alopecia, and seborrheic alopecia. Given their ability to modulate the immune system, as well as neuronal networks associated with emotional cognition, the most frequently targeted acupoints were ST 36, GV 20, and LR 3. The proposed mechanistic effect is dependent upon disease etiology and is theorized to be twofold: reduction of inflammation and decrease in testosterone levels. The limited side effect profile of acupuncture makes it an advantageous treatment option, however, factors including cost, time, limited access, and aversion to needles may serve as barriers to treatment.

Front Med (Lausanne).2022 Jun 9;9:868079. doi: 10.3389/fmed.2022.868079. eCollection 2022.

Source: PubMed

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Acupuncture for Cancer-Related Insomnia

Jialing Zhang, et al.

Abstract
Background: Cancer-related insomnia is a highly prevalent complaint in cancer patients. However, there is no meta-analytic synthesis explored the efficacy of acupuncture for cancer-related insomnia among cancer patients undergoing active cancer treatments.
Objective: This systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to explore the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for insomnia in people diagnosed with cancer.
Study design: Systematic review and meta-analysis of existing randomized controlled trials on acupuncture in the treatment of cancer-related insomnia.
Methods: According to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) Statement, we identified and extracted the trials through November 2021 from ten databases and two trials record platforms (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PUBMED, Web of Science, PsycINFO, Allied and Complementary Medicine, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang Digital Journals, ClinicalTrials, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform). The quality of the trials was assessed using Jadad score and Risk of Bias (2.0). A meta-analysis was synthesized using the random-effects model if the included studies were in high methodological quality.
Results: A total of 690 studies were identified, with 22 were included in the review, and 6 of them were included in the quantitative synthesis. Studies were highly heterogeneous in terms of participant characteristics and study methodologies. Most studies recruited patients diagnosed with a specific cancer type, and breast cancer patients were the subgroup most represented. The qualitative review of available evidence suggested a beneficial efficacy of acupuncture on sleep without serious adverse events in several studies (55%). The meta-analysis revealed that acupuncture produced a significant improvement in the total Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) score relative to the wait-list control among breast cancer patients undergoing active cancer treatments (MD -1.92, 95% CI -3.25 to -0.59, p = 0.005). Similar improvement of real and sham acupuncture on PSQI score change post-intervention was found (MD: -0.68, 95% CI: -2.44 to 1.07, p = 0.44). Manual acupuncture had similar effective rate as compared to estazolam immediately post-intervention (RR: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.87 to 1.01, p = 0.09), and had significantly better effective rate than estazolam at 1-week post-intervention follow-up (RR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.10 to 1.43, p = 0.0009). All reported acupuncture related adverse events were mild or moderate in severity.
Conclusion: Acupuncture has great potential to be used to manage cancer-related insomnia for cancer patients or survivors. More studies with rigorous designs and larger sample size are warranted to verify the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for insomnia among people diagnosed with cancer, in particular among those with clinically significant insomnia.

Phytomedicine.2022 Jul 20;102:154160. doi: 10.1016/j.phymed.2022.154160. Epub 2022 May 14.

Source: PubMed

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Mechanism of Action of Zhi Gan Cao Decoction for Atrial Fibrillation & Myocardial Fibrosis in a Mouse Model of Atrial Fibrillation

Lei Gao, et al.

Abstract
Abstract
Atrial fibrillation (AF), a commonly seen cardiac disease without optimal curative treatment option, is usually treated by traditional Chinese medicine in China. The Zhi-Gan-Cao decoction (ZGCD) is an alternative medicine for clinical use and has definitive effects. It remains to be defined regarding the specific components and related mechanisms of ZGCD for the treatment of AF. We determined the primary constituents and major targets of the herbs in ZGCD using the TCMSP, HERB, and BATMAN-TCM databases. The UniProt databank database amended and combined the prospective names to supply objective data and records. Every target connected to AF was generated using the GeneCards databank, Drugbank database, TTD, Disgenet database, and OMIM. After identifying possible common targets between ZGCD and AF, the interface network illustration "ZGCD component-AF-target" was created using Cytoscape. We obtained 175 constituents and 839 targets for seven herbal drug categories in the ZGCD and identified 1008 targets of AF. After merging and removing repetitions, 136 collective targets between the ZGCD and AF were removed using the Cytoscape system. These renowned targets were generated from 38 suitable components from among the 157 components. GO enhancement examination and KEGG enrichment analysis by Metascape identified the close connection between the critical target genes and 20 signaling pathways. Then, we injected isoproterenol subcutaneously into the mouse and gave gavage with roasted licorice soup. Two weeks later, mouse were processed and sampled for testing. The results of HE and Masson staining showed that ZGCD effectively alleviated the degree of myocardial fibrosis. As indicated by qRT-PCR and Western blotting, ZGCD significantly reduced COL1A1, COL1A2, COL3A1, and TGF-ß1 in myocardial fibrotic tissue to reduce myocardial fibrosis and treat AF by interfering with the expression of COL1A1, COL1A2, COL3A1, and TGF-ß1 in myocardial tissue. ZGCD may treat AF by lowering the degree of myocardial fibrosis.

Comput Math Methods Med. 2022 Jun 9;2022:4525873. doi: 10.1155/2022/4525873. eCollection 2022.

Source: PubMed

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