Points - Recent Research
Ginsenoside Rg1 Prevents Chemotherapy-Induced Cognitive Impairment: Associations with Microglia-Mediated Cytokines, Neuroinflammation, and Neuroplasticity
Analgesic Effect of Sinew Acupuncture for Patients with Soft-Tissue Injuries
An Innovative Anti-Cancer Chinese Herbal Formula Exhibited Multi-Targeted Efficacies in Metastatic Breast Cancer Mouse Model

Ginsenoside Rg1 Prevents Chemotherapy-Induced Cognitive Impairment: Associations with Microglia-Mediated Cytokines, Neuroinflammation, and Neuroplasticity

Shi DD1, et al.

Abstract: Chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment, also known as "chemobrain," is a common side effect. The purpose of this study was to examine whether ginsenoside Rg1, a ginseng-derived compound, could prevent chemobrain and its underlying mechanisms. A mouse model of chemobrain was developed with three injections of docetaxel, adriamycin, and cyclophosphamide (DAC) in combination at a 2-day interval. Rg1 (5 and 10 mg/kg daily) was given 1 week prior to DAC regimen for 3 weeks. An amount of 10 mg/kg Rg1 significantly improved chemobrain-like behavior in water maze test. In vivo neuroimaging revealed that Rg1 co-treatment reversed DAC-induced decreases in prefrontal and hippocampal neuronal activity and ameliorated cortical neuronal dendritic spine elimination. It normalized DAC-caused abnormalities in the expression of multiple neuroplasticity biomarkers in the two brain regions. Rg1 suppressed DAC-induced elevation of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), but increased levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 in multiple sera and brain tissues. Rg1 also modulated cytokine mediators and inhibited DAC-induced microglial polarization from M2 to M1 phenotypes. In in vitro experiments, while impaired viability of PC12 neuroblastic cells and hyperactivation of BV-2 microglial cells, a model of neuroinflammation, were observed in the presence of DAC, Rg1 co-treatment strikingly reduced DAC's neurotoxic effects and neuroinflammatory response. These results indicate that Rg1 exerts its anti-chemobrain effect in an association with the inhibition of neuroinflammation by modulating microglia-mediated cytokines and the related upstream mediators, protecting neuronal activity and promoting neuroplasticity in particular brain regions associated with cognition processing.

Mol Neurobiol. 2019 Jan 18. doi: 10.1007/s12035-019-1474-9. [Epub ahead of print]

Source: PubMed

[TOP]


Analgesic Effect of Sinew Acupuncture for Patients with Soft-Tissue Injuries

Chen HY1, et al.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the immediate analgesic effect of sinew acupuncture for patients with soft-tissue injuries (STIs).
METHODS: Two hundreds eligible adult patients suffering from STIs were recruited and received sinew acupuncture with flexible treatment schedules. The number of treatment sessions was pragmatically decided by each patient on the basis of their pain relief. The outcome measurement was the change of pain rating in the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) during the first 5 sessions. The adverse effect was also observed.
RESULTS: Of the 200 patients recruited, 7 were excluded due to incomplete data. In total, 888 sinew acupuncture treatments were administered to patients at 14 injury sites (including head, neck, shoulder, arm, chest, elbow, wrist, hand, waist and hip, knee, thigh, calf, ankle, and foot) where pain was felt. Compared with the baseline, the VAS rating after the first and last treatments were both significantly reduced at all the injury sites (P<0.01). The VAS rating was also significantly reduced after each session of treatment in the first five sessions (P<0.01). No serious adverse effect was observed.
CONCLUSION: Sinew acupuncture had not only an immediate analgesic effect for STIs, but also an accumulated analgesic effect during the first 5 treatment sessions.

Chin J Integr Med.2019 Jan 18. doi: 10.1007/s11655-019-3061-3. [Epub ahead of print]

Source: PubMed

[TOP]

An Innovative Anti-Cancer Chinese Herbal Formula Exhibited Multi-Targeted Efficacies in Metastatic Breast Cancer Mouse Model

Yue GG1,2, et al.

Background: The incidence and mortality of cancer metastasis is high worldwide. Despite of the chemotherapeutic agents, many cancer patients still take traditional Chinese herbal prescriptions as adjuvant treatments. However, most of these herbal formulae/products lack of evidence-based efficacy. Based on our previous investigations on anti-tumor, anti-angiogenic, anti-metastatic, bone protective and immunomodulating activities of various Chinese herbal medicines, four constituent herbs, namely Andrographis paniculata, Acanthopanax senticosus, Camellia sinensis, and Hedyotis diffusa were eventually selected to form an innovative herbal formula.
Methods: The anti-tumor efficacies of the formula were evaluated in metastatic breast cancer mice model. The bone protective and immunomodulatory effects were also assessed after formula treatment.
Results: Our results showed that the breast tumor weight as well as lung and liver metastasis in mice could be reduced after herbal formula treatment for 4 weeks. The breast tumor-induced osteolysis in mice was restored by herbal formula treatment, in which the bone volume in treated mice tibia was comparable to that in the non-tumor bearing normal mice. The IL-12 level was augmented and the survival of mice with metastatic breast tumors was prolonged after treatment. Furthermore, combination of herbal formula with chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin resulted in better anti-tumor efficacy and increased life span in tumor-bearing mice, when compared with doxorubicin alone treatment.
Conclusions: In summary, our innovative Chinese herbal formula was demonstrated to possess anti-tumor, anti-metastatic and bone-protective activities in metastatic breast tumor-bearing mice. The preclinical data generated in this study would lead to the development of evidence-based supplement as adjuvant therapy for metastatic breast cancer.

Chin Med. 2018 Dec 22;13:64. doi: 10.1186/s13020-018-0222-9. eCollection 2018.

Source: PubMed

[TOP]



Featured Products

Chinese Herbs

TCM Books




TOW Store
This Month's Articles

February 20198

Volume 17, Number 2

Points of Interest

Acupuncture Point Location Center
Needle

Clinical Doctoral Program

Today's TCM Tip

For inflammation, add LI4 and LI11

Keep Informed

Sign Up for Our
FREE e-Newsletter

All Contents Copyright 1996-2015 Cyber Legend Ltd. All rights reserved. Use of this website is subject to our Terms and Conditions. All logos, service marks and trademarks belong to their respective owners.

Legal Disclaimer Notice: The information provided on this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging. You should not use the information on this site for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem or for prescription of any medication or other treatment. You should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem. You should not stop taking any medication without first consulting your physician.