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Home > Newsletters > January 2005 >

Season Points

By Nathalie Dessi

 I was taught acupuncture by my own acupuncturist who did miracles with me and lots of other patients. His treatment was mainly based on pulse diagnosis and season points.

First he would do a pulse diagnosis to see if there was a problem with the meridians themselves or if he would just have to treat local points (for back pain for instance) plus some distant points. Depending on the meridian pulse (you know there are 28 different ones), he would treat the meridian if it was affected.
He would also use the season table (Fig. 1) to treat the meridians preemptively: when we change season, the properties of some points change, and also some meridians are more likely to be affected than others (like lungs and large intestine meridians in Autumn). At the beginning of autumn, for example, he would treat the TONIFYING points of the lungs and large intestine meridians, anyway (but would check before if the pulse was not too strong to be tonified).

The season points can be divided into 2 categories: Tonifying points and Dispersing points.

What my acupuncturist would do:

  1. Check the season points to tonify them and cure preemptively (check if the pulse is OK first, no need to give more energy to a balanced meridian)

  2. Check the pulse of all the meridians and establish a diagnosis. If a pulse was really weak, instead of only treating a point to give more yang to the whole meridian, he would also use the season point to tonify the pulse.

  3. One rule is to never use the Dispersing points alone. However, if you have to use a point that is dispersing the season you are treating, you have to counterbalance that effect by simultaneously using the opposite point that is tonifying and that will not take the energy out of the meridian. Of course, in the case of a yang affection, you want to bring more yin, but never disperse the energy only; it must stay within the meridian!! You may just bring more yin or divert it with a Luo point to the coupled meridian.

  4. The season changes may also depend on where you live; at the junction of some seasons, look around you to see which season you are in (between 5th season and spring, the difference is the weather around you, the animals’ behavior, etc.)

List of meridians to treat preemptively:
Season Meridian to tonify preemptively
Spring Liver and Gallbladder
Summer Heart, Pericardium, Small Intestine, San Jiao
Autumn Lungs, Large Intestine
Winter Kidney and Urinary bladder
5th Season Spleen, Stomach

List of Tonifying and dispersing points:

Meridian

Spring

Summer

5th Season

Autumn

Winter

 

D

T

D

T

D

T

D

T

D

T

Heart

H8

H3

H7

H9

H4

H8

H3

H7

H9

H4

Small Intestine

SI5

SI2

SI8

SI3

SI1

SI5

SI2

SI8

SI3

SI1

U Bladder

UB60

UB66

UB54

UB65

UB67

UB60

UB66

UB54

UB65

UB67

Kidney

K2

K10

K3

K1

K7

K2

K10

K3

K1

K7

Pericardium

P8

P3

P7

P9

P5

P8

P3

P7

P9

P5

San Jiao

Sj7

Sj2

Sj10

Sj3

Sj1

Sj7

Sj2

Sj10

Sj3

Sj1

Gallbladder

GB38

GB43

GB34

GB41

GB44

GB38

GB43

GB34

GB41

GB44

Liver

L2

L8

L3

L1

L4

L2

L8

L3

L1

L4

Lungs

Lu10

Lu5

Lu9

Lu11

Lu8

Lu10

Lu5

Lu9

Lu11

Lu8

Large Intestine

LI5

LI2

LI11

LI3

LI1

LI5

LI2

LI11

Li3

LI1

Stomach

St41

St44

St36

St43

St45

St41

St44

St36

St43

St45

Spleen
(Pancreas)

Sp2

Sp9

Sp3

Sp1

Sp5

Sp2

Sp9

Sp3

Sp1

Sp5

See how it is important to know the season points: 1 point can have an opposite effect depending which time of the year it is used. If I have to use St36 in summer, I also use St 43 to counterbalance the dispersing effect that could harm the meridian’s harmony.

Season Chart:

Season changes can vary depending in which part of a country you live (for instance in the South of France, Spring starts about 1 or 2 weeks before it does in the North part; it is also a matter of climate, people should be able to recognize the changes of seasons with a bit of experience and observation). The 5th Season is the period between 2 seasons, like a twilight zone, when Summer is over and Autumn has not started yet, for instance.

Season

Beginning

End

Spring

12th February

24th April

5th Season

25th April

12th May

Summer

13th May

26th July

5th Season

27th July

14th August

Autumn

15th August

28th October

5th Season

29th October

14th November

Winter

15th November

24th January

5th Season

25th January

11th February

To sum up:

  • Take the pulse: tonify the meridians preemptively if needed – Fig.1 - (once during the season should be enough)
  • Chose the points to cure the disease and look in the DT table – Fig. 2 - to check if the points chosen are not dispersing (if they are, add the opposite point)
  • And you have Fig. 3 to check the dates
    Good luck and don't hesitate to contact me if you require further information:nathalie.dessi@cec.eu.int

 

This Month's Articles

January, 2005
Volume 3, Number 1

Syndrome X, Diabetes and Chinese Medicine

10 Simple Ways to Control Your Weight

Season Points

Recent Research

Ask The Doctor

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