Points - Recent Research
Therapeutic Effects of Moxibustion Simultaneously Targeting Nrf2 and NF-κB in Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy
Initial Effects of Electroacupuncture for Chronic Severe Functional Constipation and the Potential Underlying Factors
Growth Inhibitory Efficacy of Cornus Officinalis in a Cell Culture Model for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Therapeutic Effects of Moxibustion Simultaneously Targeting Nrf2 and NF-κB in Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Li J1, et al.

Abstract
Moxibustion is the main alternative medicine treatment that has been beneficial to diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), a common complication secondary to diabetic microvascular injury. However, the underlying protective mechanism of moxibustion against neuroinflammation remains unclear. We hypothesized that moxibustion treats DPN by regulating the balance of nuclear factor-2 erythroid-related factor-2 (Nrf2)-nuclear factor-kappa light chain enhancer of B cells (NF-кB). In vivo, diabetes was induced in rats by injecting streptozotocin (STZ; 60 mg/kg; i.p.). Moxibustion was then applied to "Zusanli" (ST 36), "Guanyuan" (BL 26), and "Yishu" (EX-B 3) acupuncture points. Nerve conduction was detected. Serum interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 levels were determined through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. NF-κB and Nrf2 proteins were examined through immunoblot analysis. The mRNA of NF-κB and Nrf2 was evaluated through RT-PCR. We found that the conduction velocity and amplitude of the action potentials of sciatic nerve conduction were reduced in the DPN model group but were rescued by moxibustion treatment. Moxibustion also improved the effect of DPN on other parameters, including ultrastructural changes, NF-κB and Nrf2 expression in the sciatic nerve, and serum IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 levels. Our data suggested that moxibustion may alleviate neuroinflammation by inhibiting NF-κB and by activating Nrf2. Moxibustion may also provide therapeutic effects for patients with DPN by simultaneously targeting Nrf2 and NF-κB.

Appl Biochem Biotechnol. 2019 Jun 17. doi: 10.1007/s12010-019-03052-8. [Epub ahead of print]

Source: PubMed

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Initial Effects of Electroacupuncture for Chronic Severe Functional Constipation and the Potential Underlying Factors

Zeng Y1, et al.

Abstract
Background: Electroacupuncture (EA) has been found to be effective for treating chronic severe functional constipation (CSFC). However, the initial effects of treatment usually affect the acceptability and compliance of patients with chronic disease in particular. Which class of CSFC patients will have a better initial response to EA remains uncertain and requires investigation.
Methods: This was a secondary analysis of an original multicenter randomized controlled trial in which patients with CSFC were randomly assigned to receive 28 sessions of EA or sham electroacupuncture (SA) over 8 weeks with 12 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome, namely, response with complete spontaneous bowel movements (CSBMs), required participants to have ≥ 3 CSBMs and an increase of ≥ 1 CSBM from the baseline over the first week of treatment. Logistic regression analysis with bootstrapping techniques was performed to determine independent factors related to the response.
Results: A total of 1051 eligible patients were included in this study of whom 161 patients were classified as responders at week 1. The CSBM response rate was higher in the EA group (17.5%) than in the SA group (13.2%). And the proportion of these 1-week early responders remained to have higher clinical response at the end of 8-week treatment and 12 weeks after treatment. Age and higher baseline CSBMs were related to CSBM response within the first week: with every 1-year increase in age, the likelihood of clinical response was reduced by 1.7% (odds ratio [OR] 0.983, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.972 to 0.993; P=0.001). The odds of a CSBM response in patients with 1< CSBMs ≤ 2 at baseline were 4.64 times higher than that in patients with CSBMs ≤ 1 (OR 4.64, 95%CI 4.01 to 5.27).
Conclusions: EA produced its initial effects within the first week of treatment. And the effects could last until week 8 and week 20. A younger age and higher number of CSBMs at baseline may increase likelihood of a response.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2019 May 6;2019:7457219. doi: 10.1155/2019/7457219. eCollection 2019.

Source: PubMed

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Growth Inhibitory Efficacy of Cornus Officinalis in a Cell Culture Model for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Telang NT1, et al.

Abstract
Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) lacks the expressions of estrogen receptor-α, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2. The treatment options for TNBC include anthracyclin/taxol based conventional chemotherapy and small molecular inhibitor based targeted therapy. However, the therapeutic efficacy is limited by systemic toxicity and acquired tumor resistance; identification of less toxic testable alternatives is urgently required. Non-toxic nutritional herbs are commonly used in traditional Chinese herbal medicine for general health management and may additionally represent a testable therapeutic alternative for TNBC. The present study examined the growth inhibitory efficacy of the nutritional herb Cornus officinalis (CO) in MDA-MB-231 cells, which represent a cell culture model for TNBC, and identified potential mechanistic leads. In MDA-MB-231 cells, CO induced dose-dependent cytostatic growth arrest [inhibitory concentration (IC)50, 0.1% and IC90, 0.5%], and inhibited anchorage independent colony formation. Mechanistically, CO inhibited G1 to S phase transition leading to G1 arrest and decreased the expression of cyclin D1 and phosphorylated-retinoblastoma proteins. CO additionally altered apoptosis specific BCL-2 associated X protein/B-cell lymphoma-2 expression and upregulated pro-apoptotic caspase-3/7 activity. Collectively, these data provided mechanistic evidence for the efficacy of CO, and validated a mechanism-based approach to prioritize efficacious nutritional herbs as testable alternatives for secondary prevention/treatment of TNBC.

Oncol Lett.2019 Jun;17(6):5261-5266. doi: 10.3892/ol.2019.10182. Epub 2019 Mar 21.

Source: PubMed

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