Points - Recent Research
Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Lateral Epicondylitis
The Effect of Acupuncture on the Day of Embryo Transfer on the In Vitro Fertilization Outcomes
Astragaloside IV Enhances Cisplatin Chemosensitivity in Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Suppressing MRP2

Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Lateral Epicondylitis

Zhou Y1, et al.

Abstract
Objective: This study aimed at assessing the clinical effectiveness of acupuncture for lateral epicondylitis (LE).
Methods: The following databases were systematically searched: China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Science and Technology Periodical Database, Wan Fang database, Chinese Biomedicine Literature, PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library from inception to May 2019. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) meeting the inclusion criteria were included. RevMan 5.3 software was used to conduct meta-analyses. The study quality was evaluated with the Cochrane risk of bias.
Results: Ten RCTs involving 796 individuals were included in this meta-analysis. Three studies reported randomized methods with a specific description. For the analyses of the clinical efficacy rate, acupuncture outperformed sham acupuncture (two RCTs, n = 130, P=0.15), medicine therapy (two RCTs, n = 124, P=0.02), and blocking therapy (four RCTs, n = 427, P=0.0001). For the analyses of the visual analog scale, acupuncture outperformed sham acupuncture (two RCTs, n = 92, P=0.18), medicine therapy (two RCTs, n = 144, P < 0.00001), and blocking therapy (two RCTs, n = 132, P=0.03). The subgroup analyses comparing acupuncture with sham acupuncture therapy revealed heterogeneities. The follow-up information and adverse reactions were not analyzed because of the insufficient number of studies.
Conclusions: Acupuncture appears to be superior to drug or blocking therapy or sham acupuncture therapy for LE. However, considering the low quality of the available trials, further large-scale RCTs with a low risk of bias are needed in the future.

Pain Res Manag. 2020 Mar 20;2020:8506591. doi: 10.1155/2020/8506591. eCollection 2020.

Source: PubMed

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The Effect of Acupuncture on the Day of Embryo Transfer on the In Vitro Fertilization Outcomes

Dehghani AS1,2, et al.

Abstract
Background: Acupuncture is an adjunct therapy to support infertile women received in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment; however, the efficacy of this approach needs more evaluation.
Objective: This randomized clinical trial (RCT) study aimed to evaluate the influence of acupuncture on reproductive outcomes in women undergoing IVF treatment.
Materials and Methods: The study was carried out on 186 participants who had undergone IVF treatment in the Mother and Child Hospital between September 2015 and February 2016. Subjects were randomly divided into three groups: Acupuncture 25 min before embryo transfer (ET) (ACU1 group, n = 62), acupuncture 25 min before and after ET (ACU2 group, n = 62), and ET without acupuncture (control group, n = 62). Pregnancy rates (biochemical, clinical, and ongoing) were evaluated and compared between groups.
Results: There were significant differences between the ACU1 group and the control group regarding biochemical (p = 0.005), clinical (p = 0.006), and ongoing (p = 0.007) pregnancies. Also, our results showed that two-session acupuncture (ACU2) lead to a significant reduction in frequency of biochemical (p = 0.002), clinical (p = 0.003), and ongoing (p = 0.01) pregnancy rates when compared to the one-session acupuncture (ACU1). No significant difference was found between the ACU2 and control groups regarding the aforementioned terms (p = 0.50).
Conclusion: Acupuncture 25 min before ET significantly increased the IVF outcomes in women undergoing IVF compared with no acupuncture. Repeating acupuncture 25 min after ET did not improve the IVF outcome.

Int J Reprod Biomed (Yazd). 2020 Mar 29;18(3):209-214. doi: 10.18502/ijrm.v18i3.6719. eCollection 2020 Mar.

Source: PubMed

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Astragaloside IV Enhances Cisplatin Chemosensitivity in Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Suppressing MRP2

Qu X1, et al.

Abstract
Abstract
Decreased chemosensitivity among tumor cells is often an obstacle in cisplatin (Cis) chemotherapy. Overexpression of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) is a key mechanism underlying decreased Cis chemosensitivity and resistance. Astragaloside IV (AS IV) is an important component derived from the well-known traditional Chinese herb Astragalus membranaceus. The aim of this study was to explore the role of AS IV in enhancing the antitumor effect of Cis by suppressing MRP2 expression in HepG2 cells and H22 tumor-bearing mice. After co-treatment of HepG2 cells with Cis and AS IV, we assessed the effects on cell proliferation and apoptosis. Tumor growth and apoptosis assessment were performed to assess chemosensitivity in H22 tumor-bearing mice. We used western blotting, immunofluorescence assays, and immunohistochemistry assays to detect MRP2 expression in HepG2 cells, H22 tumor tissues and mouse kidney tissues. AS IV enhanced Cis chemosensitivity by increasing tumor cell apoptosis and slowing tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. MRP2 overexpression in tumor cells was induced by Cis, which contributes to decreased chemosensitivity and Cis resistance. Co-administration of AS IV suppressed MRP2 expression in tumor tissues, which might be an important mechanism for enhancing Cis chemosensitivity in hepatocellular carcinoma. Moreover, AS IV alleviated Cis-induced kidney injury in mice without changing MRP2 expression. In total, AS IV enhanced the antitumor effect of Cis against hepatocellular carcinoma by suppressing MRP2 expression in tumor cells. The results provide a new insight into the combined use of a chemotherapy drug and natural ingredients to treat cancer.

Eur J Pharm Sci. 2020 Apr 4;148:105325. doi: 10.1016/j.ejps.2020.105325. [Epub ahead of print]

Source: PubMed

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