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Points - Ask the Doctor

Q: Is there some kind of self-massage technique I can do to warm up my hands and feet? Are there herbs that can help improve my circulation?


A: Limbs get cold when blood vessels constrict or become obstructed; Chinese medicine considers coldness of the body to be a diminished flow of fire energy. While massaging the cold areas can help increase blood flow and warmth, you will get more powerful results with a self-healing technique called acupressure. Acupressure is the art of stimulating energy points using your own fingers. Give it a try!

Great Surge (LIV-3)

This point has the ability to move energy and blood throughout the body, helping to relieve energy stagnation. This point is located on your foot in the web between your big and second toes. Apply steady pressure to your right foot with your left thumb until you feel soreness. Hold for 2 minutes, and then repeat on your left foot.

Yes, there are herbs that can help. But first, a very easy way to help bring the warmth from your core out to your hands and feet is to drink hot water (think tea without the teabag). If tea is more your speed, you can brew yourself a toasty warming tea by steeping 1 teaspoon of ground cinnamon and 1 teaspoon of ground cloves in 3 cups of hot water. Add 1 teaspoon of ginger for more flavor.

Not a fan of tea? Try taking warming herbs and supplements like ginkgo, turmeric, garlic, or omega-3 fish oil daily to help boost circulation and warmth to your extremities. You can find these supplements at health food stores.


About our Doctors

This month's Ask the Doctor question was answered by:

Dr. Mao Shing Ni, Ph.D., D.O.M., L.Ac. . from his website:

 



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November 2012

Volume 10, Number 11

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