Points - Recent Research
Does Moxa Smoke Have Significant Effect on the Acupuncturist's Respiratory System?
Acupuncture for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial Studying Changes in Clinical Symptoms and Electrodiagnostic Tests
Rhodiola/Cordyceps-Based Herbal Supplement Promotes Endurance Training-Improved Body Composition But Not Oxidative Stress and Metabolic Biomarkers

Does Moxa Smoke Have Significant Effect on the Acupuncturist's Respiratory System?

Yu C1, et al.

Abstract
Objectives: To evaluate the safety of moxa smoke, especially to provide quantitative information and details for the occupational prevention of acupuncturists.
Methods: We combined the questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey and lung function testing-based historical retrospective cohort research to investigate the safety of moxa smoke exposure (MSE) among acupuncturists. A mathematical regression model was established to quantitatively evaluate the relationship between moxa smoke exposure and the respiratory health of the acupuncturist. The smoke exposure time of the acupuncturist and the prevalence of abnormal respiratory symptoms or diseases were also evaluated.
Results: (1) The cross-sectional research showed that the incidence of expectoration (18.7%) and rhinitis (22.7%) was the most common respiratory symptom and disease after MSE. No statistical difference was found between smoke exposure time of the acupuncturist and the prevalence of abnormal respiratory symptoms or diseases, except the prevalence of rhinitis and shortness of breath (P < 0.01). Regression model for the incidence of first three symptoms (expectoration, shortness of breath, and wheezing) from the cross-sectional survey indicated that the weight coefficients of factors associated with moxa smoke were lower than those of factors unrelated to moxa smoke, such as gender and personal history of respiratory diseases. (2) Historical retrospective cohort research showed that there was no significant difference in the % predicted PEF. No statistic difference was found between the exposed and nonexposed group in large airway function indexes (% predicted FEV1, % predicted FVC, and % predicted FEV1/FVC) and small airway function indexes (% predicted FEF25, % predicted FEF50, % predicted FEF75, and % predicted MMEF), either. Especially, the % predicted MVV among males (106.23  2.92 vs. 95.56  1.92, P < 0.01 and % predicted VC among females (100.70  1.59 vs. 95.91  1.61, P < 0.05) between the two groups had statistical significance, but did not cause pulmonary ventilation dysfunction.
Conclusions: MSE has no significant effect on the respiratory health of acupuncturists.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2019 Sep 16;2019:4873235. doi: 10.1155/2019/4873235. eCollection 2019.

Source: PubMed

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Acupuncture for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial Studying Changes in Clinical Symptoms and Electrodiagnostic Tests

Bahrami-Taghanaki H, et al.

Abstract
Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most frequent entrapment neuropathy in humans. Nonsurgical management is still a matter of debate, and conservative treatments include splinting, local steroid injections, ultrasound, and oral steroids. Acupuncture and electroacupuncture therapy for symptomatic CTS may improve symptoms and aid nerve repair as well as improve sensory and motor functions. However, limited evidence based on comprehensive evaluation methods is available regarding the effects of those treatments.
Objective: The study intended to compare the short-term effects of acupuncture and conventional medical treatment on CTS patients' clinical symptoms and on the results of their electrodiagnostic tests.
Design: The research team designed a randomized controlled trial.
Setting: The study took place at the electrodiagnostic clinic of the School of Persian and Complementary Medicine at Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (Mashhad, Iran).
Participants: Participants were 60 patients at the clinic with the clinical diagnosis of CTS.
Interventions: Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups. Patients in the control group received 100 mg of Celebrex as tablets, 2 times daily. Patients in the intervention group received 12 sessions of acupuncture, each for 30 min, for 4 wk. The needle insertion points were fixed for all sessions. In addition, wrist braces were provided to wear at night for 1 mo in both groups.
Outcome Measures: At baseline, postintervention at the end of week 4, and at a 3-mo follow-up at the end of week 16, participants' clinical symptoms-pain, numbness, tingling, weakness/clumsiness, and night awakenings-and the results of their electrodiagnostic studies were evaluated and compared.
Results: In total, 49 patients completed the study-24 in the control group and 25 in the intervention group. Compared with the control group, the intervention group's clinical symptoms-pain, numbness, tingling, and muscular weakness-based on the subscales of the global symptoms score questionnaire as well as the overall score on that questionnaire improved significantly (P < .05). Regarding the electrodiagnostic studies, only the distal motor latency showed a significantly greater decrease in the acupuncture group in comparison to controls (P = .001).
Conclusion: All clinical symptoms and the results of the electrodiagnostic tests improved significantly in the intervention group, and the improvements continued during the 3 mo postintervention. The therapeutic results of acupuncture were mostly similar to and in certain cases better than those of the conventional medical treatment. Therefore, acupuncture can be suggested as a safe and suitable therapeutic method in CTS.

Altern Ther Health Med. 2019 Oct 1. pii: AT5538. [Epub ahead of print]

Source: PubMed

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Rhodiola/Cordyceps-Based Herbal Supplement Promotes Endurance Training-Improved Body Composition But Not Oxidative Stress and Metabolic Biomarkers

Liao YH1, et al.

Abstract
Rhodiola crenulata (R) and Cordyceps sinensis (C) are commonly used herbs that promote health in traditional Chinese medicine. These two herbs have also been shown to exhibit anti-inflammation and antioxidant functions. Regular endurance training reveals potent endurance capacity, body composition improvement, and metabolic-related biomarker benefits. However, it is not known whether the combination of Rhodiola crenulata and Cordyceps sinensis (RC) supplementation during endurance training provides additive health benefits. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 8-week endurance training plus RC supplementation on body composition, oxidative stress, and metabolic biomarkers in young sedentary adults.
METHODS: Fourteen young sedentary adults (8M/6F) participated in this double-blind randomized controlled study. Participants were assigned to exercise training with placebo groups (PLA, n = 7, 4M/3F; age: 21.4 0.4 years) and exercise training with the RC group (RC, 20 mg/kg/day; n = 7, 4M/3F; age: 21.7 0.4 years). Both groups received identical exercise training for eight weeks. The body composition, circulating oxidative stress, and blood metabolic biomarkers were measured before and after the 8-week intervention.
RESULTS: Improvement in body composition profiles were significantly greater in the RC group (body weight: p = 0.044, BMI: p = 0.003, upper extremity fat mass: p = 0.032, lower extremity muscle mass: p = 0.029, trunk fat mass: p = 0.011) compared to the PLA group after training. The blood lipid profile and systemic oxidative stress makers (thiobarbituric reactive substanceand total antioxidant capacity) did not differ between groups. Although endurance training markedly improved endurance capacity and glycemic control ability (i.e., fast blood glucose, insulin, and HOMA index), there were no differences in these variables between treatments.
CONCLUSIONS: In this preliminary investigation, we demonstrated that an 8-week RC supplementation (20 mg/kg/day) faintly enhanced endurance training-induced positive adaptations in body composition in young sedentary individuals, whereas the blood lipid profile and systemic oxidative stress states were not altered after such intervention.

Nutrients. 2019 Oct 3;11(10). pii: E2357. doi: 10.3390/nu11102357.

Source: PubMed

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